Peace Education

Soon The Earth School founded by myself and my dear friend and partner Esme Davis, will be 10 years old!

It is time to take stock.

If we were to sum up the essence of The Earth School in 2 words it would be ‘peace education’. Children who are fully accepted for themselves and supported in their explorations find peace within them and go on to make up a peaceful society.

The proof is in the pudding though and given that the pudding is still baking, we turn our sights to small occurrences that reveal that peace education is at work. The ‘easy to miss’ occurrences that are sometimes sweet (And Oh! There is such sweetness with children) and often times occurrences that appear to be a 1000 miles away from peace, for our children oftentimes, practice making peace by engaging in conflict!

The first time a young child is able to articulate  how she is feeling to a guide, (I am feeling sad now, please sit with me) or an older child takes ownership for his actions while being insightful and gentle with his folly (“I destroyed that because I was feeling jealous. I really should apologize”)

When an entire school community rises up to welcome the youngest entrants to school. By encouraging them with smiles and greetings, keeping an eye out for them and helping them with their belongings.

It is when an older child feels comfortable and safe in our community to celebrate herself on her birthday and writes about her own advances from her first year of life to.her ninth! A birthday celebration becomes a performance piece … a deeply authentic one.

Where an adults love for poetry is supported to become a whole school ‘poem in your pocket day’. Children and parents linger to share poetry with each other.

When a parent body trusts the school enough to support them in their policy of having 2 hours of free play everyday for all children from ages 3 to 12! After a year no child is recommended for Occupational Therapy!

When a child is struggling with reading, writing and arithmetic but is still frequently sought after by peers to help with all manner of drawing, building and problem solving in the environment.

When a child feels the joy of giving a presentation to a peer and with her thumbs up, gestures to an absorbed friend, and whispers to the guide “She is working so nicely!”

This, my friends, is peace education at work!

Earthworms are Superheroes

earthworm

All too often children get mixed messages about nature.

On one hand adults romanticise nature to children and expound liberally about how important it is to ‘save’ mother earth and we wax lyrical about the beauty of nature. On the other hand we all too often prohibit them from playing in the rain and slush, use the word ‘dirt’ synonymously for ‘soil’ and cringe when we chance upon a ‘bug’ or worm or ‘creepy-crawly’. When a young child instinctively bends down to pick up a tiny creature she comes across we hasten to get it out of their hands!

The fact is children come unconditioned about the creatures they share this planet with and slowly take on the prevailing attitudes of those around them. This is an important evolutionary step. It is how we learn about our world from the experiences of others. We learn what to stay away from and what to seek. In times long past it was the line between life and death itself!

A parent who delights in the simplest things of nature usually has a child who delights in nature too. I have a young friend, just past 3 years who LOVES ‘bugs’. She enjoys looking at them, handling them and talking about them. They make her world interesting and magical. You don’t have to look far to find out where this fascination comes from. You just have to meet her mother!

Upon hearing the word, ‘worms’ most people cringe, right?

Walk into school and you will find an entirely different mind set when it comes to earthworms! They inspire awe and the children are truly fascinated by them. The child who has found an earthworm wriggling about on a cloudy, rainy day, feels s/he has chanced upon true treasure.

The internal anatomy of the earthworm has been sewn onto cloth and made into  soft toys with the shiniest beads used to denote their 5 hearts. Clay models have been fashioned, poems have been written and thick books completed, paying homage to the earthworm.

They are the ‘new’ super heroes at school.

Upon hearing about the great work that earthworms do one child pondered, “Just like earthworms don’t know the important work they do for earth, do we humans also not know some great work that we are doing?”

Earthworms

by Valerie Worth

Garden soil,

Spaded up,

Gleams with

Gravel-glints,

Mica-sparks,

and

Bright wet

Glimpses of

Earthworms

Stirring beneath:

Put on palm,

Still rough

with crumbs,

They roll and

Glisten in the sun

As fresh

As new rubies

Dug out of

Deepest earth.

Cosmic Education – nourishment for a lifetime

touching-the-universe

I recently gave the first great lesson – the story of the universe to the elementary children. This is a period of great excitement, questions and ponderings for the children and well, for me too.  I am always especially excited for the children who are hearing this epic tale for the first time. An entire universe is unlocked and ready for their explorations.

The entire Montessori ‘curriculum’ during the elementary years is dubbed as ‘Cosmic Education’. Cosmic Education connects all players in the Cosmic Drama, both animate, as well as inanimate. It is an opportunity for the child to unify themselves with the very cosmos!

Lofty ideals these, but Montessori is ALL about lofty ideals. The primary aged child has the gift of developing a ‘unified self’, the elementary aged child has the gift of ‘unifying with the cosmos’ and the adolescent, ‘unifying with ones fellow beings’.

Each and every year I see these stupendous ideals fleshed out into practical experiences that guide the children on their path.

This year, soon after I presented the story of the universe to the children I saw the movie ‘Agora‘. It’s the fictionalised story of the life of Hypatia– the Alexandrian mathematician and philosopher who lived during the 4th century CE. Living through times of religious strife, Hypatia managed to hold on to her beliefs and till the very end dedicate her life to probing the secrets of the universe. At a time when the mere thought that the workings of the cosmos was anything less of pure perfection was considered heresy, Hypatia anticipated that the earth went around the sun in an elliptical orbit. Now an ellipse was considered an ‘impure’ shape – a base figure as compared to the ‘perfect’ circle, where the centre is constantly equidistant from its diameter. Hypatia was a woman far beyond her times.

While viewing the movie (which had it’s good and bad points, but this is not a film review) I couldn’t help but see a parallel between Hypatia and the elementary child. Both probe the secrets of the cosmos and ‘touch’ it with their gift of imagination, are sensitive to issues of fairness, cannot help but ask BIG, philosophical questions and attempt to find answers guided by their reasoning mind.

I often meet adults who have completely lost touch with the child they once were. Philosophical questions, the awesomeness of the universe and all the many splendours out there, leave them unmoved while they plod along life’s path miserable in their day-to-day existence.

My hope is that children who have received cosmic education will, no matter how old they get, always have the child they once were alive in them. No matter what difficulties life throws in their path, and there surely will be many challenges, they will never cease to feel wonder at this truly majestic universe that we inhabit, never cease to ask questions bigger than themselves and never fear to look for answers.

In short, my hope is that the Cosmic Education they receive will last them a lifetime.

“Cosmic Education is intended to help each of us search for our cosmic task as a species and as individuals. To do this, we must understand ourselves in context. It is only against the background of our place in the universe, our relationships with other living organisms, and our understanding of human unity within cultural diversity, that we can attempt to answer the question, ‘Who am I?’”

~ Micheal Duffy and D’Neil Duffy – Cosmic Education – Children of the Universe

To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour.

~ William Blake

How Does Our Garden Grow? – Part One

Each time I heard about the food forests that were planted, the townships that had metamorphosed into edible landscapes and the wonderful things people were growing on their tiny terraces, I felt intrigued. I also felt ignorant. My experiments with gardening were limited and at best, free form. I had done some planting with the children in previous years but not as a sustained effort.

I knew that we really ought to be gardening with the children… growing veggies, herbs and other plants. Through this contact children would be inspired to observe and understand the interconnectedness of all things; to experience the power of nature and her cycles. Even with my most cursory readings on the topic of permaculture, I could see the connection between permaculture, cosmic education and education for peace that we strive to follow in Montessori schools. BUT I felt inadequate to guide the children. I hesitated and failed to follow the enthusiasm and fascination children display in natural processes. This was a big, gaping missing piece at school.

Thanks to committed and passionate parent volunteers who have taken on the job of preparing our outdoor environment the missing piece has been found and put into place. They have opened up new ways for us to look at things – educating and guiding us.

I have only just started learning about different aspects to permaculture and am excited with this door that has been opened.

This is my attempt to document our learning and our plans.

A week ago we made three raised beds along a passage wall outside our kitchen.

First bags of cocoa peat, compost, soil and rolls of cardboard and tarpaulin were brought in.

compost

Wood from our woodworking room was converted into frames for our raised beds. Additionally, discarded coconut shells were purchased from the neighbourhood coconut-water seller to make even more raised beds. The first time we saw this was during a school visit to Vanastree where they also used the coconut husks to make steps around the farm!

To make the raised beds we first lined the concrete on which the beds were to sit with tarpaulin, then inside the wooden frame sat a layer of corrugated cardboard and in went the rich soil, compost and cocoa peat.

3 beds

All that was left to do was the sowing.

sowing

We planted all manner of treasure – 2 varieties of chillies, brinjals and tomatoes, lemon basil, turmeric, sunflowers, maize, marigolds, capsicum and drumstick, using companion plants as much as possible.

packets of seeds

On top went a light layer of mulch.

mulch layer

It was such a happy experience for us.

Already the corn, capsicum, tomatoes and chillies have germinated.

Corn
Corn

In the meanwhile  we have found that the soil in the gardening patch for the children is seriously depleted. It lacks aeration and has too much of clay. We have done a ‘double dig’ and planted leguminous seeds to do their magic. Observing the soil and how things are going, the patch is going to need some more time and care to get things going. Eventually we plan to have a ‘keyhole’ design utilising the edge effect.

Most of our hanging baskets are no more filled with just ornamental plants. They have been converted to herb baskets, holding plants like ‘Jalla Bhrami’, Mint, Thyme, ‘Ajwain’ or Bishop’s Weed, interspersed with a few ornamental flowers.

Around the coconut trees we have planted gourds which should climb up toward the sun.

And then there are other features planned:

water body in the front garden made using a recycled child’s bathing tub. Hopefully it will demonstrate an aquatic eco system and bring in the frogs and birds. I have been promised some papyrus cuttings from a friend which should do nicely in it. (The children are going to be thrilled with the papyrus. Not only because of their fascination with all things ‘Ancient Egyptian’ but also because it has a triangular stem!)

A spot for our cacti and succulent garden. This is will grow slowly, getting filled over time.

A tiny tepee in the back garden, sitting close to our banana plant. Creeping and entwining through it will be a bean plant.

In phase two we will look at recharge wells to replenish ground water.

Some of the plans may work and others may not. It’ll be interesting to see what happens and why and then think about what we should do next.

Watch this space for more updates of our experiments at school.

“How often is the soul of man–especially that of the child–deprived because one does not put him in contact with nature” – Dr. Maria Montessori  (from Childhood to Adolescence)

The Making of Timelines

This summer break I have been busy with making the ‘missing’ timelines for the elementary environment.

Having already oriented themselves to their immediate environment in their first plane of development from 0 to 6 years, children in the second plane of development from 6 years to 12 years, seek to orient themselves to the entire cosmos.

In a Montessori environment, the universe itself is opened up to them through ‘Cosmic Education”. The lietmotif of Cosmic Education is the interdependance of all things, both animate and inanimate, and the gratitude that arises from this understanding.

Looking back in gratitude to all the participants in the drama of cosmic evolution is a subtext that plays constantly in the background of the elementary classroom.

The absence of easy accesibility to a vendor who stocks Montessori timelines in India has in fact been a boon. I have always found my understanding of a work crystallise when I am engaged in making the material myself. Moreover, the connection of the ‘hand’ to the material becomes more evident to the children.

Over the past two weeks rolls of cloth have been examined, measured and cut. An enterprising, and possibly only ‘alteration tailor’ in Bangalore has been befriended. Skeins of silk embroidery floss have been pulled out of dusty drawers and the tape measure has become my constant companion.

KHADI

First Stop was Khadi Bhandar, where the fabric was purchased. The patient salesman heard our request for unusual measures of cloth. Meters upon meters of black khadi, strange measures of blue, brown, green and red khadi were purchased.

Gandhi's beloeved Khadi
Gandhi’s beloved Khadi

SREEDHAR’S SHOP ON WHEELS AND THE BLANK TIMELINE OF LIFE

I have to admit this is the first time I have come across this particular piece of ingenuity. Sreedhar, an evidently enterprising gentlemen drove up to school in his tailoring shop on wheels!

For the next 6 hours he helped us put together the blank timeline of life. After hearing me wax lyrical about the timeline and explain the idea behind the colour coded strips of cloth, Sreedhar was sufficiently charmed by the idea of making it.

We had blue for the Paleozoic Era where life predominantly existed in the waters of earth, a brown strip to represent the Mesozoic Era where life invaded the land, a green strip for the Cenozoic Era where grass, mammals and birds evolved and finally a tiny strip of red to represent humans on earth.

The blank timeline is a blank replica of the timeline of life which charts the evolution of life. Children place pictures, labels and cards of information on pre-historic life and paleogeography onto the blank timeline to construct their own timeline of evolution. By engaging in this work they discover many inter-dependancies – the plants, the animals, the rocks, the oceans, the mountains, even the ice-ages, all interdependant, forming the web of life.

The sliver of a red strip at the end, represents humans. It visually communicates the short time that humans have lived on earth, as compared to all the other players.

The child eventually comes to see herself as the beneficiary of cosmic gifts.

Each year I hear, “Earth has been home to the jellyfish, amoeba, sponges etc etc, so much longer than it has been our home!” or “It is amoeba who are really our ancestors!”

Sreedhar's shop on wheels
Sreedhar’s shop on wheels
All measured up
All measured up
The completed timeline
The completed blank timeline of life

THE LONG BLACK STRIP

The story goes that the idea of the black timeline came to Montessori when she was residing in India. She had recently had a conversation with a child who had told her that there was nothing that he could learn from someone in the West as India had the oldest real civilisation in the world.

Later she observed workers in the heat and dust of Madras laying black cables in the ground.

From these two things was born the idea of the Long Black Strip – 300 meters of black cloth that represented 3 billion years of our universe’s history. The last few centimeters were coloured white to represent the time that humans have lived on earth.

Today we have reduced the 300 meters to 30 meters, and replaced the white strip with a red one.

Though the timeline does not precisely respresent the current accepted date of 4.5 billion years, it is an attempt to create an impression of the miniscule time that humans have made Earth their home.

The Long Black Strip is a compelling lesson in humility.

timeline black

THE HAND CHART

The hand chart creates an impression about the importance of the hand – of work – to humans.

It is a black strip of cloth representing 7 million years of human evolution. Bang in the center is a picture of a hand with a stone tool. There is also a slim red strip right at the end that represents the birth of writing and recorded history.

All throughout the history of humans, it is their ability to work that has helped them survive.

Here echoes a message: be grateful to those of previous generations who have faithfully, lovingly, and expertly done their work in the world so that you may have life and the benefit of their knowledge!

The Hand
The Hand

 

People say that narrow paths are difficult to walk about, yet, once you have narrowed down the whole, the vast and the big, to its least denominator, the narrow path is simple,
thanks to the process of reaching it.
Christoph Schiebold

Why The Kangaroo Hops

About a month ago, we at the elementary were lucky enough to catch a splendid, magical show, ‘Saltbush Cheering Carpet‘, that was visiting our city. It is was about 2 aboriginal friends that journey across Australia and learn the secrets of their land.

Since then the elementary children have been researching all things Australia and a web of Australia has filled our environment.

The children have studied human migration routes, paleogeography and crustural plates, Australia’s political and economic geography, it’s the flora and fauna, how people satisfied their fundamental needs – then and now, indigenous Australian art, and of course, dreamtime myths.

Finally, as a consolidation of everything they had been working on, the children produced a play.

They chose from the stories they had written in the style of dreamtime myths, through a secret ballot.

The story they voted for was “Why The Kangaroo Hops”.

Each afternoon for a week, they practiced their play. Each evening they worked with their parents to make their costumes.

Finally, they performed the play for the entire school on the day of our christmas celebrations!

Though I have worked with the elementary children for 10 years now, I never know where an experience will take us. A month ago as we sat mesmerized by the show, ‘Saltbush Cheering Carpet’,  no one had any idea that our christmas celebrations would have in it rainbow serpents, kookaburra’s and goannas!

 

Chossing from a list of aboriginal art symbols o paint on their faces
Choosing from a list of aboriginal art symbols to paint on their faces for the play
narrator
Once upon a dream time, there lived a kangaroo that loved to race with his friends. But because he was so slow, he always lost.
After a race in which he lost again, the kangaroo went to the Rainbow Serpents home in the outback and begged the Rainbow Serpent to give him speed. The great Rainbow Serpent agreed, but warned that the kangaroo should never use his speed to make others feel bad.
After a race in which the kangaroo had lost yet again, he could take it no more and made his way to the great Rainbow Serpents home in the Outback. He begged the Rainbow Serpent to give him speed.
The Rainbow Serpent agreed, but warned the Kangaroo to never use his new speed to make others feel bad.
The Rainbow Serpent agreed, but warned the Kangaroo “Never use your new speed to make others feel bad. Remember to always be kind and gentle to others”
It was the day of the great race and guess what? Much to the surprise of everyone, the Kangaroo won! Though the others were happy for him, the Kangaroo forgot all about his promise to the Rainbow Serpent and started making fun of the others!
It was the day of the great race and guess what? Much to the surprise of everyone, the Kangaroo won! Though the others were happy for him, the Kangaroo forgot all about his promise to the Rainbow Serpent and started making fun of the others!
The Rainbow Serpent soon heard about the Kangaroos rude behaviour and at a conference with the carpet snake, kokaburra and goanna, cursed, "From this day forward, all kangaroos will be destined to hop and not run. Yes, they will be able to hop fast, but each time they spring into the air, they will be reminded to be kind and gentle to others!"
The Rainbow Serpent soon heard about the Kangaroo’s rude behaviour and at a conference with the carpet snake, kookaburra and goanna, cursed, “From this day forward, all kangaroos will be destined to hop and not run. Yes, they will be able to hop fast, but each time they spring into the air, they will be reminded to be kind and gentle to others!”
That's all folks! Hope you enjoyed the show!
That’s all folks! Hope you enjoyed the show!

A Searching We Go

What are they looking for?!?

In Mr. K’s words, “Something older than dinosaur bones!”

That’s us on our moss hunt!

Recipe for Moss Milk (to grow your own moss)

from The Evolution Book by Sara Stein

1 cup of spore capsules

1 cup of milk

Put in a blender. This should break open the capsules and release the spores. The milk will provide some nutrition for the young moss.

Put liquid in a spray bottle and spray into crevices, rocks and other places that are constantly damp.

Spray water on these places for a while to ensure constant moisture.

In time you should see your own moss grow.

Story of the Universe – Part 2

Following on from my previous post, here is another project completed by one of the children after the Story of the Universe – a stitchery book depicting the birth of the universe and formation of earth.

I wanted to share this work with you as its such a wonderful marriage of handwork, an impressionistic lesson and science.  It reads a little like a fairy tale.

Though I am sharing the ‘product’ here, it is the process through those days that was truly beautiful.

It required a lot of planning and perseverance from the boy. For 9 1/2 days he sat with the sewing box,creating page after page in deep concentration. He applied his previous learning and noticed the refinement of his skills over the days. By the time he had reached the last page in his book, he required no help and even ‘created’ his own weaving stitch. He realized his own independence and commented on it several times. It was self-direction at its strongest.

Apologies for the quality of the photographs, but they were taken on my phone, just before the boy borrowed the book from the library to show his folks at home.

UNIVERSE HISTORY BOOK
First there was NOTHING!
But a tiny point of pure energy that contained the entire universe.
Suddenly the dot of pure energy exploded and out came the universe
The energy cooled down to make tiny particles of matter
After 300,000 years the first atoms – atoms of Hydrogen gas were formed. Clouds of hydrogen swam in space.
Hydrogen and dust pulled together because of gravity to make stars
Earth was formed. It was really hot and it was a ball of gas
1000’s of volcanoes erupted on earth and covered earth in a big cloud of gas, dust and ash
Sun is covered and the earth cooled down
Earth is flooded by rain
Earth gets water. Now there are solids, liquids and gases on earth. The sun is uncovered

Story Of The Universe

We are a month into the new academic year and the children who have recently joined our elementary environment have received their first great lesson – THE STORY OF THE UNIVERSE. The story is accompanied by many experiments, including a show stopper – blasting a volcano! This year around, we used ammonium di chromate in the volcano for some real BANG, instead of the tame baking powder and vinegar routine. Needless to say it was all very exciting.

Along with the younger children, the older children too had the benefit of receiving the story again and like every year, it has sparked off great work!

Today, one of the many projects undertaken by the children after the telling of the story was completed.

After reading the awe inspiring book, ‘Born With A Bang – The Universe Tells Our Cosmic Story‘ by Jennifer Morgan and Dana Lynne Anderson, two boys decided to make a timeline depicting some of the major events in the Universe’s history.  There is a concise page at the back of the book that lists some of these major events and was just the right morsel for the boys.

Here is the long and short of their timeline.

They did some finger knitting and converted its length into a timeline. Each foot on the length of their finger knitting accounted for 1 billion years.

The timeline in our library corner, above the light box. Below is the much loved volcano. The timeline goes all along the wall ….
… and wraps around …
… to the other side …

A brass bell signals each major event. With it is a card that explains what happened at that point in time. The first two events are so close together that they have been strung one on top of the other – but – true to the need for precision that characterizes the elementary child, they are just ever – so – slightly, askew.


BIG BANG – less than 1 second old – In a fraction of a second the universe went from the size of a dot to the size of a galaxy …1 second to 3 minutes – the universe cooled down to 3,000 degrees and that was enough for the neutrons and protons to form …300,000 years after the Big bang it cooled down enough for the first atoms to form. The first atoms were of Helium and Hydrogen … 

1 billion years after the Big Bang galaxies formed. Mother stars were born. After stars die their stardust makes new stars that have complicated elements …

2 billion years after the Big Bang the Milky Way formed. Older star clusters joined new star clusters

7 billion years after the Big Bang our mother star might have exploded. There might have been more than one mother star that might have created our solar system …

8 billion years after the Big Bang our sun formed from clouds of gas and dust which came from a supernova of our mother star. Gravity made the clouds squeeze together. Atoms of Hydrogen joined to make Helium. This made the cloud shine. It was now a star…

8 1/2 billion years after the Big Bang the planets formed. One planet was perfect – not too hot, not too cold.

For the sake of convenience the timeline has now moved to a new location – above the science material.

“let us give him a vision of the whole universe. The universe is an imposing reality and an answer to all questions. We shall walk together on this path of life, for all things are part of the universe and are connected with each other to form one whole unity.” ~ Maria Montessori (To Educate The Human Potential)

Parent Education

Parent education is a vital part of a schools work. It benefits the child, the school community and Montessori education in general.

There are many layers that we have to touch upon.

There’s the understanding of child development and how it relates to the physical and psychological aspects of the child’s environment. Then there’s the whole curriculum side of things and how that connects to the characteristics of the child it seeks to serve. The shallow, popular notions of child rearing that an irresponsible media constantly bombards parents with serves to add fuzz, and another layer that we have to reckon with.

In the past we have had book readings and a silent journey of discovery. We have paid home visits and care is taken that very individual meeting with a parent touches upon these points. We also regularly send out articles and have a parent library at school.

The times when I feel we have been most successful in our efforts is when there are opportunities for the parents to actually ‘work’ with their hands.

Recently we had an orientation for the parents of our elementary children. We focused on ‘Cosmic Education’

Cosmic Education is an all-inclusive six-year curriculum for elementary age children.

It demonstrates the interconnection and interdependence of all things, both animate and inanimate and relates all academic subjects to each other.

Most importantly it answers the questions typically asked by elementary age children and places the child’s primary orientation to life, firmly in the universe.

How do you make apparent so many nuances?

Therein lies the beauty of Montessori. All of it has been made so concrete and accessible.

We started the session by briefly talking about the characteristics of the 6 to 12 year old child.

We then related 2 of the 5 great lessons that elementary children receive.

First was The Story of the Universe. It is about how our universe came into existance, the formation of stars and planets, ending with the formation of our very own earth.

Next up was The Coming of Life . It starts off from where we left off in The Story of the Universe, and charts the evolution of life on earth.

After the Great lessons, we moved into 3 groups and the parents received small group lessons. They then did an hour of follow up work, just like our children do in class.

One group got a story about an animal – the sponge. It was the very same story we give the children, full of the ‘strangeness’ of the sponge.

examining picture cards to arrive at common characteristics of sponges
clay model of a colony of sponges
referencing the sponge

Another group received a story about the life and death of stars. Besides the sequence of the life cycle of a star, the amazing fact that we are all star stuff  was highlighted in the story.

testing elements forged in the bellies of dying stars
referencing supernovas
referencing stars

The third group received a presentation with 3D Solids. They ran the shapes in sand to find the paths made by the different faces. They then traced these paths to make nets for the solids. After that they moved onto platonic solids.

tracing the paths of 3D solids
collaborating to make a dodecahedron while sitting under an icosahedron
making a dodecahedron out of paper

After this work, we gathered in a group and shared our experiences.

We laid out labels with the names of different subject areas.

Each time a parent saw a connection between two areas, we connected them with yarn.

building a web of connections

We ended by revisiting the characteristics of the elementary child and asking the question “Did the curriculum serve these characteristics?”

The parents left with the article ‘Montessori Community Values: Sowing the Seeds of Morality’ by Greg MacDonald.

All in all it was a good session. I know that we have to build on what we’ve laid here, but like they say, “little drops of water make the mighty ocean!”