Earthworms are Superheroes

earthworm

All too often children get mixed messages about nature.

On one hand adults romanticise nature to children and expound liberally about how important it is to ‘save’ mother earth and we wax lyrical about the beauty of nature. On the other hand we all too often prohibit them from playing in the rain and slush, use the word ‘dirt’ synonymously for ‘soil’ and cringe when we chance upon a ‘bug’ or worm or ‘creepy-crawly’. When a young child instinctively bends down to pick up a tiny creature she comes across we hasten to get it out of their hands!

The fact is children come unconditioned about the creatures they share this planet with and slowly take on the prevailing attitudes of those around them. This is an important evolutionary step. It is how we learn about our world from the experiences of others. We learn what to stay away from and what to seek. In times long past it was the line between life and death itself!

A parent who delights in the simplest things of nature usually has a child who delights in nature too. I have a young friend, just past 3 years who LOVES ‘bugs’. She enjoys looking at them, handling them and talking about them. They make her world interesting and magical. You don’t have to look far to find out where this fascination comes from. You just have to meet her mother!

Upon hearing the word, ‘worms’ most people cringe, right?

Walk into school and you will find an entirely different mind set when it comes to earthworms! They inspire awe and the children are truly fascinated by them. The child who has found an earthworm wriggling about on a cloudy, rainy day, feels s/he has chanced upon true treasure.

The internal anatomy of the earthworm has been sewn onto cloth and made into  soft toys with the shiniest beads used to denote their 5 hearts. Clay models have been fashioned, poems have been written and thick books completed, paying homage to the earthworm.

They are the ‘new’ super heroes at school.

Upon hearing about the great work that earthworms do one child pondered, “Just like earthworms don’t know the important work they do for earth, do we humans also not know some great work that we are doing?”

Earthworms

by Valerie Worth

Garden soil,

Spaded up,

Gleams with

Gravel-glints,

Mica-sparks,

and

Bright wet

Glimpses of

Earthworms

Stirring beneath:

Put on palm,

Still rough

with crumbs,

They roll and

Glisten in the sun

As fresh

As new rubies

Dug out of

Deepest earth.

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How Does Our Garden Grow? – Part Two

To continue the documentation of our garden experiments at school, here are the sketches of our plans that were designed by our wonderful parent volunteer. She shared them with us yesterday and in turn I am sharing them with you. I want to mention here, that these plans might change as we start implementing them, just like the plans for presentations we make for ourselves in the classroom.

RAISED BEDS ALONG THE KITCHEN PASSAGE

Kitchen Passage

Kitchen Passage

List of plants in the raised beds in the kitchen passage:

Box 1:

Corn – 2 varieties (Rainbow Corn and 1 other); Bhindi (Okra) – Sri Lankan; Brinjal – 2 varieties ( Apple Green Brinjal and ‘Hiltalu Brinjal’); Capsicum – Prima Bella

Box 2:

Tumeric; Drumstick; Sunflowers; Marigold; Chilli – 2 varieties ( Cayenne and 1 other); Garlic; Tomatoes – 2 varieties ( Round and Cherry)

Box 3:

Beans; Celery; Cosmos; Radish; Cauliflower

SEMI-CIRCULAR RAISED BED NEXT TO THE WATER MOTOR ENCLOSURE

Next to the water motor enclosure

Next to the water motor enclosure

Here we have Dill, Onions, Beetroot and Cabbage

AROUND THE COCONUT TREES

Around the coconut trees

Around the coconut trees

Coconut tree one (or the tree with the parrot)

This tree has a pre-existing boundary ledge in concrete going around it in a square, which means we have little choice but to stick with the square shape.

Here will be ‘maggay’ cucumber; nutmeg; lime and ginger

Coconut tree two ( or the tree with the sandalwood!)

This tree had no pre-existing boundary in concrete so a ‘yin yang’ design was made.

Much to my delight, when we rented the school space there was a sandalwood tree growing next to the coconut tree. It was just a sapling but now has taken firm root and is growing well. This is a much sought after plant in India, and is used widely in religious ceremonies. The tree further reached mythical proportions in popular culture thanks to Veerappan, a notorious dacoit who poached sandalwood and evaded the governments of 3 states for 20 years! Thefts of even the smallest sandalwood trees are quite common.

We plan to plant some sponge gourd as well. Loofahs are made out it’s fruit when dried. You find these loofahs in most cities in India, often times with seeds still in them!

Stinging nettles! – The nettle plant found us rather than the other way around. So, they have a bad name and yes, the plant at school is a little toxic but they are also loved by some caterpillars, butterflies and moths and us at school! The children are fascinated by their red cherry-like fruit and their leaves that sprout thorns along their mid-ribs. The nettle definitely stays.

Additionally we will plant lettuce and carrots.

CHILDRENS GARDENING PATCH OUTSIDE THE ELEMENTARY ENVIRONMENT

Children's Gardening Patch

Children’s Gardening Patch

This area is just below a splendid rain tree with a sprawling canopy, which means that it probably does not receive enough sun to grow vegetables and flowers. But herbs and leafy greens should work well here.

Yesterday we laid out a keyhole design. The herbs and greens that should do well in this area are listed below. Being the first round of planting, we have done the planning without the children, keeping the soil, sun, water conditions in mind. By the time the second round of planting comes around, having tended the plants and observed the space, the children will be able to participate in the planning stage as well.

Basil; Rosemary; Lemon Grass; Parsley; Sage; Chakramuni; Red Amaranth; Spinach; Corriander; Thyme; Oregano; Fenugreek; Mustard; Golli Soppu; Green Amaranth; Mint and in the centre – Cosmos.

To better understand what will grow and won’t in this area we will plant some veggies in pots and place them around the patch. If they don’t do well then we can always move them to a sunnier spot.

Here are the proposed veggies for the pots. When the children come from their summer break, we will plan which veggies to plant together:

Tomato; Lettuce; Capsicum; Beans; Brinjal

“When we understand that man is the  only animal who must create meaning, who must open a wedge into neutral nature,  we already understand the essence of love. Love is the problem of an animal who  must find life, create a dialogue with nature in order to experience his own  being.”  ~ Ernest Becker

A Searching We Go

What are they looking for?!?

In Mr. K’s words, “Something older than dinosaur bones!”

That’s us on our moss hunt!

Recipe for Moss Milk (to grow your own moss)

from The Evolution Book by Sara Stein

1 cup of spore capsules

1 cup of milk

Put in a blender. This should break open the capsules and release the spores. The milk will provide some nutrition for the young moss.

Put liquid in a spray bottle and spray into crevices, rocks and other places that are constantly damp.

Spray water on these places for a while to ensure constant moisture.

In time you should see your own moss grow.